Help for Heroes launches ’40,000 strong’ miniature figures campaign

Minature figures of wounded veterans are being offered to supporters who donate online, as the charity begins a UK tour of a 40,000 strong art installation.

Joe Lepper | 10th Oct 19

Help for Heroes has launched a digital fundraising campaign offering a miniature figure of a wounded veteran to those who donate online.

The promotional push by the charity is called 40,000 strong to highlight the number of ex service personnel who have had to leave the Armed Forces due to injury or illness over the last 20 years.

The campaign involves the creation of a 40,000 strong installation of figures of ex-service personnel in Manchester’s Arndale Centre from this month ahead of a national tour. This is also being promoted online via Youtube and the charity’s website.

In addition the charity has produced boxed figures and is giving them away to those who offer an online donation. Online donations of £5, £10 or £20 are being sought, with supporters invited to call the charity if they want to offer an alternative or smaller amount.

> See also: Online hunt for family photos by military children’s charity

 

Difficult transition to civilian life

A charity survey found that seven out of ten of those medically discharged from the armed forces found the transition to civilian life a negative experience.

An average of seven people are medically discharged everyday, according to the charity.

“Thousands of those discharged are falling through gaps in the Ministry of Defence’s (MoD’s) support,” said Help for Heroes.

“That’s why we have created our 40,000 strong model force to help show the true scale of those who have put their lives on the line for us.”

Online promotion for the campaign also offers supporters the chance to raise further funds, sign up for more information or volunteer.

Want to stay on top of the latest tech news in the third sector?

Get top insights and news from our charity digital experts delivered straight to your inbox three times per week.

Subscribe