Grant open for ideas that use tech to uphold democracy

Open to small charities, NGOs and other projects, the Challenge Award will fund a project that harnesses technology’s power to support democracy and help ‘reframe’ the role of technology.

James Hayes | 11th Jul 18
Image shows senior executives in conference. The Charity Excellence Framework software platform now being piloted tracks a range of management and governance issues to inform charity leaders.

The Challenge Award has opened for entries, offering funding grant of £10,000 to a project that leverages technology to support democracy.

The initiative is the first charitable grant to be made by DADI Foundation, the non-profit organisation backed by cloud and blockchain technology startup DADI (Decentralised Architecture for a Democratic Internet).

The Challenge Award is open to small charities, NGOs, and new projects that support or develop robust and inclusive democracies. In addition to the funding grant of £10,000, the award will provide the project with a combination of technical expertise, project management guidance, mentorship and ongoing support for sustainability and scalability.

Launched earlier this year, the DADI Foundation’s purpose is to harness technologies to empower the most marginalised, ensuring fair access to technology and supporting robust and inclusive democracies.

The DADI Foundation was created as an extension of DADI’s work to ‘democratise’ the Internet. The foundation operates as an independent entity, and provides research, education and grants to ensure that technology is embedded as a key tool for advancing human rights globally, accessible where it is needed to promote basic rights, and developed with the protection of human rights as a core principle.

“There is growing evidence that we need to reframe technology’s role in a world with an increasingly unequal distribution of wealth and power,” said Jennifer Martin-Nye, Chief Executive at the DADI Foundation. “We look forward to addressing that challenge by using technology in a proactive, positive way – helping the tech industry and human rights sector to tackle root causes of injustice, and bridging the gap between technological expertise and human rights activism. We are excited to be opening up the foundation’s first grant as part of that mission. A second round of grants opens later this year [that will be] focused on issues such as gender and conflict as barriers to effective participatory democracy.”

Entry to the first round is open until 31st July 2018; the shortlist will be confirmed in August, with the winner to be announced in September.