Charities among new Digital Leaders DL 100 list

High-achievers in UK digital transformation across all sectors and regions are recognised by DL 100 judges – they include a diverse range of charitable organisations.

Chloe Green | 22nd Jun 18
Image from the Digital Leaders 100 awards. 10 UK charities are included in the latest Winners of the DL 100 list of digital transformation exemplars.

Age UK, SafeLives and Lifelites are among the ten UK charities featured in the Digital Charity of the Year category of the latest winners of the DL 100 list of digital transformation exemplars, announced this week.

Organised by Digital Leaders, the initiative for promoting digital transformation across government, industry and charities, the list recognises 100 people and organisations across the UK who the initiative’s 17 judges believe are leading the way in digital transformation in all sectors.

Others cited in the Digital Charity of the Year category include Art UK, Ada, the National College for Digital SkillsPaisley YMCAHelp RefugeesWales Co-operative Centre, New Philanthropy Capital, and SpecialEffect.

The 100 finalists that make up the overall list received more than 25,000 votes. Showing strong diversity the DL100 2018 list has 65% female members, highlighting the leading women now active across the UK’s digital sectors.

Eleven out of the 12 DL UK regions are represented in this year’s list, which also reflects the national reach of the Digital Leaders Community, the organisation said. Outside of London and the South East, the strongest regions were Scotland, the South West, Yorkshire and the North West.

“Our community of Digital Leaders have shone a light on the many hidden heroes, quietly getting on with the nation’s digital transformation,” said Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Chair at Digital Leaders. “It is fabulous to see such a strong list from outside London this year reflecting our own inclusive national programme and the growing importance of digital transformation on companies irrespective of size or sector.”

“It’s a list nominated by our growing community of 100,000 and shortlisted by 17 independent judges before a public vote from 25,000 voters puts them into this final order,” said Robin Knowles, CEO at Digital Leaders. “There are few digital communities that can claim they have crowdsourced an open list with over 65% female representation in the top 100 – particularly as ‘Diversity’ is not a category or even mentioned in the shortlisting criteria.”