New smartphone app to highlight brain condition

App designed to get people moving, get people thinking and reduce the often overwhelming sense of isolation that can follow a brain injury

Chloe Green | 2nd Feb 18
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The team behind a new smartphone app are urging people to let their feet do the talking to raise awareness of a brain condition.

BrainWalk is the centrepiece of a global campaign led by the Encephalitis Society to highlight the condition, an inflammation of the brain, ahead of World Encephalitis Day on February 22.

The app, which can be downloaded from the Apple iStore or Google Play, is designed to get people moving, get people thinking and reduce the often overwhelming sense of isolation that can follow a brain injury.

Dr Ava Easton, Chief Executive of the Encephalitis Society, said: “Our hope is to bring people together whose lives have been affected by encephalitis and work towards a common goal of walking around the world to raise awareness of this devastating condition.”

“We estimate that it takes 52 million steps to walk around the globe. In isolation that seems like an impossible figure to reach by World Encephalitis Day, but we believe we can achieve anything by coming together and working towards a common goal.

“Statistics show that eight out of 10 people do not know what encephalitis is – a startling figure which we are striving to improve through campaigns such as BrainWalk and World Encephalitis Day.”

As well as counting the number of steps users take on a daily basis, BrainWalk also features brain teaser-style games and information about encephalitis, the work of the Encephalitis Society and details research into the condition.

App users can also join their country team or set up their own team and battle it out on a World Encephalitis Day leaderboard.

Double Olympic gold medallist Rebecca Adlington, who is an Ambassador with the Encephalitis Society, launched BrainWalk at the House of Commons last week.

“Having a background in sports, I know first-hand the difference that exercise can have on physical and emotional wellbeing which is why I believe this campaign can have a real and lasting benefit for users while also making the public aware of encephalitis,” says Rebecca, whose sister, Laura, was affected by the condition, an inflammation of the brain, several years ago.