Charity selfie campaigns have made Gen Y second highest donors » Charity Digital News

Charity selfie campaigns have made Gen Y second highest donors

According to new research from Mintel, shareable social media campaigns have sparked a rise in charitable contributions amongst 16-24-year-olds.

Of UK consumers who gave money to charity in a three month period, it was those aged 16-24 who gave the second highest amount, on average donating £40. In comparison, those aged 35-54 gave the least at £33 and those aged over 55 came out as digging the deepest, donating £52.

Could the reason behind this rise in charitable giving amongst Generation Y have anything to do with the rise of viral social media campaigns such as #IceBucketChallenge and #NoMakeUpSelfie? It would seem so, as the ‘nomination’ aspect of such campaigns provides more of an incentive to take part, donate and set an example to their friends. Mintel’s research also highlighted how 23% of 16-24’s say they feel guilty if they don’t donate when someone asks them, compared to an average of just 12%.

Ina Mitskavets, Senior Consumer and Lifestyles Analyst at Mintel, said:Charitable giving has been given a new life with the emergence of selfie fundraising on social networks, appealing to younger donors who have traditionally less actively engaged with charitable causes. Campaigns such as #nomakeupselfie and #IceBucketChallenge opened up new ways of soliciting for charitable donations, with participants feeling the urgency of making a contribution in order to be part of a good cause. The social campaigns and charity selfies also capitalise on the ‘fear of missing out’ (FOMO) prevalent on social media, with participation driven further if someone is ‘nominated’ to take part.”

“The idea that good deeds should go unnoticed is being replaced by open declarations of donations to charities and fundraising campaigns started on the internet.”

“As one generation of donors replaces another, this means that charities will soon be confronted with a different reality, where they are no longer able to receive steady contributions from reliable donors doing so out of habit. This would mean that charitable organisations will need to work harder to understand how to connect with potential donors from younger generations and increase their participation.”

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  • “The idea that good deeds should go unnoticed is being replaced by open declarations of donations to charities and fundraising campaigns started on the internet.” – I would very much so agree with this statement. I am often seeing statuses nowadays starting with “Done my good deed for the day…” something which was casually said before in conversation has become something which people post with pride across their social media platforms. Charities have been able to use this to our advantage by giving people the opportunity to showcase their “good deed” and the feel good factor which comes with supporting a charity really has got the potential to increase thanks to the reach which social media provides.

    • James Appleton

      Yes, I definitely prefer the positive spin — “Let’s all get involved!” — to the guilt angle in the article — “Mintel’s research also highlighted how 23% of 16-24’s say they feel guilty if they don’t donate when someone asks them, compared to an average of just 12%.”