Wink Bingo partners with the Peter Andre Fund » Charity Digital News

Wink Bingo partners with the Peter Andre Fund

Peter Andre

Wink Bingo has become the latest partner of cancer charity The Peter Andre Fund.

The organisation is an arm of Cancer Research UK that is specifically dedicated to improving early diagnosis rates.

Andre himself has been a major champion and fundraiser for cancer research in the last few years after the sad death of his brother Andrew, who died of the disease in 2012.

The singer has compared losing his brother to losing a vital body part, recently telling OK! magazine: “The bottom line is, you can never really deal with it because it’s a loss, but it’s on a much larger scale. You can still function in life but it’s never going to be the same.”

Andre’s charity the Peter Andre Fund gives money to initiatives including the Cancer Awareness Roadshow, which was set up thanks to a partnership with the Marie Keating Foundation and Ronan Keating. It has already paid for the addition of two new mobile units that are used to spread the message about early diagnosis of cancer.

Andre says: “I have been to the Cancer Awareness Roadshow a few times myself and they are literally on the road to beating cancer!”

Wink Bingo partnership

Wink Bingo’s partnership with the Peter Andre Fund will help to buy more mobile units for the Cancer Awareness Roadshow.

The Hearts of Gold campaign sees donations made by Wink Bingo of up to 30 per cent of bingo ticket prices, with prizes of up to £5,000 on offer to players. At least £50,000 is expected to be raised through the promotion. Andre says: “I’m thrilled to join forces with Wink Bingo’s lovely players, who are known for their hearts of gold. Together, we can beat cancer sooner!”

A Facebook campaign will also be launched as part of the partnership between The Peter Andre Fund and Wink Bingo.

Various bingo games are available at Wink Bingo, including 5-line, 75-ball and 90-ball games.

Guaranteed bingo jackpot games also take place on Wink Bingo every day.

Importance of early diagnosis

Cancer Research UK believes that the earlier diagnosis of cancer ought to be viewed as an efficiency, on top of being a top quality priority for the NHS.

Last year, a report found that late diagnosis of four cancers – colon, lung, ovarian and rectal – could be costing the NHS as much as £150 million a year.

A recent Cancer Research UK study that was published in the British Journal of General Practice also found that seeing different GPs may have an impact on how quickly bowel and lung cancers are diagnosed.

Dr Matthew Ridd, study leader and senior lecturer in primary care at the Centre for Academic Primary Care at the University of Bristol, stated that GPs ought to follow up patients who have presented with potential cancer symptoms in order to achieve a timely diagnosis.

The GP said: “We also found that your regular doctor might not be the best person to spot those symptoms in the first place … getting a second opinion from a different doctor could speed up the time to diagnosis.”

Peter Andre has become one of the UK’s top champions of the importance of early cancer diagnosis since the death of his brother, with the star encouraging members of the public to raise money for Cancer Research UK through his Pete’s Champions scheme.

The challenge ran until the end of March, with those who raised the most money through the Pete’s Champions scheme receiving special gifts and an invite to a meet-and-greet with Andre.

Andre had global chart-topping success with hit songs Mysterious Girl and Flava in the 1990s and starred on the third British series of I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! in 2004.

In association with Wink Bingo.

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